Basic movement training - Plan 3

The "workouts" presented here serve as an introduction into our movement training. The main goal of these plans is to improve or maintain health and freedom of movement. The purpose is to create more understanding and awareness of movement.

The plans presented here don't require any notable degree of fitness. With certain exercises I offer different options, which are indicated by level (Level= L. For example: L1, L2 etc.) so that the suitable version may be chosen. I do this in particular when it comes to exercises in the field of strength and mobility, as these need to be more precisely adapted to the individual in order to make sure the training can be performed successfully.

If you have injuries or chronic problems, you will obviously need to be cautious. Perform the exercises that work the injured parts carefully. You may have to make the decision to leave certain exercises out.

Working with these exercises in a careful, self-responsible way can heal injuries.

Every injury is different. Generalizing is difficult here.

In this plan we will engage with the following ideas and principles:

- Training the pessimum

How do I move optimally? How do I move in a way that is not wearing out my joint or create injury? These questions are essential to investigate. They are not easy to answer. There are many - partially very contradictory - answers. In the first plan, we already familiarized ourselves with the principle of "the dose makes the poison". We also know "use it or lose it".
In this plan follows another building block: training the pessimum. Reality doesn't take place in the optimum. When things get chaotic, when things need to happen fast, when other people are involved, things do no longer run optimally. It is crucial to delve into the optimum and to explore how you can move in gentle ways. At the same time, we are aware that suboptimal movements occur in our everyday lives. Therefore we train the pessimum.
This means that we go into the angles of the joints, which are not optimal. In this plan, this includes, for example, exercises C and D in the category "feet". Here we aim at getting more robust in these awkward angles over time and at being able to load the feet with more weight. Feet strengthened in the pessimum are better protected from injuries such as sprains.
So if we train the pessimum and prepare ourselves for chaos, we can avoid injuries. Again it's essential to remember that the dose makes the poison. If you look into what could happen, you can prepare for it and react accordingly.

Principle: We train the pessimum to protect ourselves from injuries.
Sub principle: to understand the pessimum, we need to explore and study the optimum.

- Softness training:

Many people are stiff. This could stem from limited movement diversity, lack of use of the full range of motion of the joints, strength training or tension-creating activities (i.e. moving heavy objects), or even from a culture in which one stiffens up from fear or the pressure to fit in. From what we've observed, stiffness occurs in all age groups except for children under 10, among which it is rare.
Strength training is closely associated with the term "training" in the conventional field. For many people, "training" means strength training. Training in other ways, is seen as accessory work for strength training (i.e. mobility training). Indeed many people are exceptionally weak from life in modernity.
So yes, differing forms of strength training are significant for health. However, not all people have muscular atrophy issues, and even among those with muscular atrophy, lots of stiffness can be observed. In those cases, the stiffness keeps the body safe. In this sense, strength training can also create softness by providing a greater sense of safety.
Despite all of this, softness training is fundamental for us in an absolute majority of cases. Softness carries with it excellent movement potential: it creates freedom of movement, allows for fastness and creates kinetic potential (actions such as throwing are based on softness).
High levels of stiffness often cause pain and use more energy. Softness training is lacking in most training programs, but it is precisely what so many people need. In this workout, the block of "soft range of motion practice" is softness training. The arm swings are as well.

Principle: softness training is injury prevention, can create freedom from pain, and creates freedom of movement.
Sub principle: Softness training and tension training need to be in the balance following the everyday life of the individual.

- Using kinetic energy

One goal with the arm swings is to learn how to use kinetic energy. All variations of the arm swings are to be performed with relaxed shoulders. The goal is to bring the energy from the legs and hips through the spine and into the arms. The movement in the legs is transferred into the arms. Thus the arms can stay relaxed and the arm swings can be done for a long time without exhaustion.
Through such efficient movement, we don't only save energy. We can also create speed and power.
The whip is an example of the use of kinetic energy: when you lash the whip, the power runs through the whip to the very front. This front part becomes so fast that it breaks the sound barrier. Thus the iconic sound of the whip.
To achieve that speed, the energy must travel uninterrupted at any point along the way. Softness is fundamental for the use of kinetic energy.

Principle: The use of kinetic energy creates efficiency, speed and explosivity. To do so, it requires a certain softness and correct coordination.

Below the training is presented with explanatory videos, but further down they are presented again without videos. This is to make the material easier to navigate and to allow for printing (the PDF version is also provided for this purpose). Between the two versions of the presentation is a follow-along-video for those wanting to do the program while watching. I recommend using this video a maximum of four times and to then work on gaining an internal understanding of the exercises. The individual explanatory videos may be used for this purpose if needed. I recommend making sure not to be reliant on video assistance within 6-8 sessions.

The plan:

Basic Workout 3

Duration: 60 Minuten

Level: 1

Terminology
r = repetitions
r/s = repetitions per side
r/t = repetitions in total
r/d = repetitions per direction
s = seconds
s/s = seconds per side
s/d = second per direction
x = sets
Anterior = forward facing
Posterior = backward facing
Retraction = pulling back
Protraction = extending

What do the letters mean?
If the same letter is used with different numbers, the exercises should be performed as a cycle.
2x
A1) Pushup
A2) Rowing
means: 2 sets of pushups and 2 sets of rowing, to be performed in alternating fashion. Meaning: 1st set of pushups, 1st set of rowing, 2nd set of pushups, 2nd set of rowing

How often should I do this workout?
If only this workout is performed: 2-4x per week.
If the basics workouts 1 & 2 or others are performed in the same week: 1-2 times a week.

Part 1 - Soft Range of Motion Practice
Spine
A) 60s Head, Figure-8 in the Frontal Plane
B) 60s Chest, move backward and forward
C) 60s Chest, glide sideways
D) 90s/d Chest, circle Transverse Plane

E) 4min/s Frontal Wave on the Wall Version 3
F) 4min/s Rotational Wave

Hands
A) 60s palms on the floor, go through different positions
B) 60s back of the hands on the floor, go through different positions
C) 30s/d back of the hands on the floor, lock the wrist, circles in the wrist
D) 30s/s Make space in the wrist (pulling on the wrist)

Pelvis
A) 90s/d Pelvis Circles Transverse Plane
B) 90s/d Lying Figure-8 Frontal Plane

C) 60s/d/s Hip circles on one leg. Isolated
D) 60s/d/s Hip circles on one leg. Integrated
E) 60s/d/s Hip circles on one leg. Freestyle

Feet
A) 60s/d/s Feet circles open kinetic chain
B) 60s/d/s Feet circles closed kinetic chain. Toes on the floor
C) 8r/s Go to the outside edges of the feet
D) 8r/s Go to the inside edges of the feet
E) 10r Calf Raises with 3 second hold at the top and bottom

Part 2 - Arm Swings
A) 120s Rotational Arm Swing
B) 120s Back and Forth Arm Swing. Line symmetry
C) 120s Back and Forth Arm Swing. Point symmetry
D) 120 Side to Side Arm Swing
E) 60s/s Crossover Arm Swing

Part 3 - Sitting
Static
A) 60s Squat
B) 30s Kneeling
C) 30s Seiza
D) 30s/s Mermaid
E) 30s/s Samurai Sit

Dynamic
A) 5r/s Shin Box Switch Version 1
B) 5r/s Shin Box Switch Version 2
C) 5r/s Half Open Kneeling to Half Open Seiza
D) 5-10r Standing to Squat to Kneeling

Part 4 - Movement on all fours
3x
A) 3r/d Inch Worm moving on the spot.
90s rest between sets.

Follow Along Video

Work in progress

The Plan without videos:

PDF Version

Basic Workout 3

Duration: 60 Minuten

Level: 1

Terminology
r = repetitions
r/s = repetitions per side
r/t = repetitions in total
r/d = repetitions per direction
s = seconds
s/s = seconds per side
s/d = second per direction
x = sets
Anterior = forward facing
Posterior = backward facing
Retraction = pulling back
Protraction = extending

What do the letters mean?
If the same letter is used with different numbers, the exercises should be performed as a cycle.
2x
A1) Pushup
A2) Rowing
means: 2 sets of pushups and 2 sets of rowing, to be performed in alternating fashion. Meaning: 1st set of pushups, 1st set of rowing, 2nd set of pushups, 2nd set of rowing

How often should I do this workout?
If only this workout is performed: 2-4x per week.
If the basics workouts 1 & 2 or others are performed in the same week: 1-2 times a week.

Part 1 - Soft Range of Motion Practice
Spine
A) 60s Head, Figure-8 in the Frontal Plane
B) 60s Chest, move backward and forward
C) 60s Chest, glide sideways
D) 90s/d Chest, circle Transverse Plane

E) 4min/s Frontal Wave on the Wall Version 3
F) 4min/s Rotational Wave

Hands
A) 60s palms on the floor, go through different positions
B) 60s back of the hands on the floor, go through different positions
C) 30s/d back of the hands on the floor, lock the wrist, circles in the wrist
D) 30s/s Make space in the wrist (pulling on the wrist)

Pelvis
A) 90s/d Pelvis Circles Transverse Plane
B) 90s/d Lying Figure-8 Frontal Plane

C) 60s/d/s Hip circles on one leg. Isolated
D) 60s/d/s Hip circles on one leg. Integrated
E) 60s/d/s Hip circles on one leg. Freestyle

Feet
A) 60s/d/s Feet circles open kinetic chain
B) 60s/d/s Feet circles closed kinetic chain. Toes on the floor
C) 8r/s Go to the outside edges of the feet
D) 8r/s Go to the inside edges of the feet
E) 10r Calf Raises with 3 second hold at the top and bottom

Part 2 - Arm Swings
A) 120s Rotational Arm Swing
B) 120s Back and Forth Arm Swing. Line symmetry
C) 120s Back and Forth Arm Swing. Point symmetry
D) 120 Side to Side Arm Swing
E) 60s/s Crossover Arm Swing

Part 3 - Sitting
Static
A) 60s Squat
B) 30s Kneeling
C) 30s Seiza
D) 30s/s Mermaid
E) 30s/s Samurai Sit

Dynamic
A) 5r/s Shin Box Switch Version 1
B) 5r/s Shin Box Switch Version 2
C) 5r/s Half Open Kneeling to Half Open Seiza
D) 5-10r Standing to Squat to Kneeling

Part 4 - Movement on all fours
3x
A) 3r/d Inch Worm moving on the spot.
90s rest between sets.

Joseph Bartz
18.03.2020