Basic Movement Training - Plan 2

The workouts presented here form a good introduction into our wide-ranging movement training. The main goal of these plans is to improve or gain health and freedom of movement. They are also intended to help create a deeper understanding and awareness of movement.

The plans presented here are constructed in a way as to be doable for most people. Sometimes we provide options, which are divided by their difficulty level (Level=L. For example: L1 = Level 1, L2 = Level 2 etc.), so that the trainee can choose a suitable version.

People with chronic or acute injuries naturally need to be cautious when approaching the parts of the plans which work the injured parts. If need be, these parts will have to be left out initially. Consult with us. Working cautiously and self-responsibly with the exercises in these plans may also help heal injuries. However, every injury is different, so it's not possible to generalize in this regard.

In this plan, we add the following ideas and principles to our understanding:

• The principle of deciding over movement and stillness: Every time we move, we make decisions regarding what moves and how. I am writing these lines on the computer and deciding which fingers to move and which not to, to write words and sentences. So when I want to perform specific movements, I need to have the ability to make decisions. One can look at such complex movements as the javelin throw in track and field, where the spear is held immobile over the head during the run-up and then at the right time brought into position and thrown. Even when running we usually make decisions regarding what moves and what doesn't: when we run forwards, the head stays typically in one position, while the chest below it rotates to the right and the left. Decisions regarding mobile and immobile parts are made in every purposeful movement. What is moved and what doesn't can be changed very quickly: one can picture a pianist who is continuously changing which fingers to move and whether the wrist stays in place or is brought over to other keys. The element of "time" is of great importance here.
Principle: purposeful movement presupposes that I can make decisions about what moves and what stays still.
Sub principle: complex movements further presuppose that I can change the settings quickly, meaning that I can fluently change back and forth between movement and stillness.

• The principle of coupling and uncoupling: This principle is a sub principle of the above. It describes how movements are always combinations of partial movements, and that we perform particular movements through tying together specific partial movements. It's equally important to be able to separate movements from one another as it is to be able to combine them. In our everyday lives, we use movement patterns which we have practices thousands of times, which are automatically called upon and performed without cognitive effort. Someone calls out behind you, and you turn around. You likely won't think about how you turn around; you'll instead just do it. You'll probably use a pattern which you have already used thousands of times, and most likely it'll be the same or one of very few patterns. We thus repeatedly perform the same movements in our everyday lives. If we slow things down, however, we notice that there are other possibilities in terms of how we turn around and look backwards. We can rotate the chest and move the eyes in the direction, while keeping the vertebrae of the neck still, like someone who is paralyzed in the neck would. Or we could bend forwards and look through our legs backwards. There are countless possibilities, big and small variations, of how we can look backwards. Connecting the right parts creates efficient movement.
Throwing is an excellent example of what adequately balanced partial movements can create: an accurate and long throw. Those who don't move through the entire body and time the parts correctly will not be able to throw far.
When we learn new movements, we always create new connections, new interactions. If we are good at separating partial movements from one another and creating new connections, we can learn new moves without great effort. Precisely therefore it's important to us to make clear decisions in our training, while these decisions provide us with great freedom of movement. We can thus learn new moves more comfortable, and we have a higher movement repertoire. Making clear decisions is further essential when it comes to preventing injuries or changing or eliminating patterns that cause us pain.
Principle: movement is an interaction. Those who can create many different interactions and make clear decisions gain freedom of movement.
Sub principle: if the interaction is timed well, we move efficiently.

Here the plan is presented with explanatory videos, but further below the plan will be presented again without videos to allow the practitioner easier navigation and make printing possible (for that there's also the PDF-version). Between both versions of the workout presentation is the "follow-along" video, which can be used as a reference when practicing. We recommend using this video maximum four times, and to then try to develop an internal understanding of the exercises. The explanation videos can be used should the need arise. Within 6-8 sessions the practitioner should be keen on following the plan without help from the videos, only using the written plan.

The plan:

Basics Workout 2

Duration: 60 Minutes

Level: 1

Terminology
r = repetitions
r/s = repetitions per side
r/t = repetitions in total
s = seconds
s/s = seconds per side
x = sets
Anterior = forward facing
Posterior = backward facing
Retraction = pulling back
Protraction = extending

What do the letters mean?
If the same letter is used with different numbers, the exercises should be performed as a cycle.
2x
A1) Pushup
A2) Rowing
means: 2 sets of pushups and 2 sets of rowing, to be performed in alternating fashion. Meaning: 1st set of pushups, 1st set of rowing, 2nd set of pushups, 2nd set of rowing

How often should I do this workout?

If only this workout is performed: 2-4x per week .
If the basics workouts 1&3 or others are executed in the same week: 1-2x per week.

Part 1 - Soft Range of Motion Practice and Arm-Swings 
Shoulders
A) 30r/t Shoulder circles parallel backwards, different arm positions.
B) 30r/t Shoulder circles parallel forwards, different arm positions.
C) 20r/s Shoulder circles in opposite directions, different arm positions.

D) 30r/t Isolated raising and lowering of the arms. Chest stays still.

E) 20r/s Counter arm circles

Standing
3min standing in „The Stance”

Arm swings
A) 3min rotational arm swing
B) 3min forwards and backwards arm swing

Part 2 - moving through sitting positions
A) 10r Front fold to squat
B) 5r/s Shin Box to tailor pose
C) 5r/s Tailor pose to straddle sit
D) 5r/s bent figure-4 to half open seiza
E) 5r/s Squat to half open kneeling

Part 3 - spinal waves
A) 10min Frontal wave at the wall version 1
B) 5min Frontal wave at the wall version 2

Part 4 - hanging and supporting
Preparation
2x
A1) 60s Anterior to posterior tilt of the pelvis, chest on the floor
A2) 60s Protraction and retraction of the shoulder blades while standing, keeping the shoulder blades in depression
No pauses between exercises.

2x
B) 60s Lying down (on the stomach) and holding the pelvis in posterior tilt. Glutes tight.
60s Pause between sets.

Work
3x
A1) 30-60s Pushup position with protracted and depressed shoulder blades and posterior pelvic tilt. Glutes tight.
A2) 30-60s Rowing position on the rings or a bar. Shoulder blades retracted and depressed.
60s pause after each exercise.

Follow Along Video

Work in progress

The Plan without videos:

PDF Version

Basics Workout 2

Duration: 60 Minutes

Level: 1

Terminology
r = repetitions
r/s = repetitions per side
r/t = repetitions in total
s = seconds
s/s = seconds per side
x = sets
Anterior = forward facing
Posterior = backward facing
Retraction = pulling back
Protraction = extending

What do the letters mean?
If the same letter is used with different numbers, the exercises should be performed as a cycle.
2x
A1) Pushup
A2) Rowing
means: 2 sets of pushups and 2 sets of rowing, to be performed in alternating fashion. Meaning: 1st set of pushups, 1st set of rowing, 2nd set of pushups, 2nd set of rowing

How often should I do this workout?

If only this workout is performed: 2-4x per week .
If the basics workouts 1&3 or others are executed in the same week: 1-2x per week.

Part 1 - Soft Range of Motion Practice and Arm-Swings 
Shoulders
A) 30r/t Shoulder circles parallel backwards, different arm positions.
B) 30r/t Shoulder circles parallel forwards, different arm positions.
C) 20r/s Shoulder circles in opposite directions, different arm positions.

D) 30r/t Isolated raising and lowering of the arms. Chest stays still.

E) 20r/s Counter arm circles

Standing
3min standing in „The Stance”

Arm swings
A) 3min rotational arm swing
B) 3min forwards and backwards arm swing

Part 2 - moving through sitting positions
A) 10r Front fold to squat
B) 5r/s Shin Box to tailor pose
C) 5r/s Tailor pose to straddle sit
D) 5r/s bent figure-4 to half open seiza
E) 5r/s Squat to half open kneeling

Part 3 - spinal waves
A) 10min Frontal wave at the wall version 1
B) 5min Frontal wave at the wall version 2

Part 4 - hanging and supporting
Preparation
2x
A1) 60s Anterior to posterior tilt of the pelvis, chest on the floor
A2) 60s Protraction and retraction of the shoulder blades while standing, keeping the shoulder blades in depression
No pauses between exercises.

2x
B) 60s Lying down (on the stomach) and holding the pelvis in posterior tilt. Glutes tight.
60s Pause between sets.

Work
3x
A1) 30-60s Pushup position with protracted and depressed shoulder blades and posterior pelvic tilt. Glutes tight.
A2) 30-60s Rowing position on the rings or a bar. Shoulder blades retracted and depressed.
60s pause after each exercise.

Joseph Bartz
2019